Hamilton to be taken off the $10: who should replace him?

Items of historical significance.

What American Women should replace Hamilton on the $10 bill?

Harriet Tubman
2
40%
Rosa Parks
0
No votes
Susan B. Anthony
0
No votes
Eleanor Roosevelt
0
No votes
Other (Please post below)
1
20%
This is a terribly dull topic. Shame on you
2
40%
 
Total votes : 5

Hamilton to be taken off the $10: who should replace him?

Postby Tejada » Sun Jul 19, 2015 3:30 pm

Current treasury secretary Jack Lew announced last month that Alexander Hamilton will be replaced on the $10 bill by an important women from American history. This is backed by the current administration and appears to be a forgone conclusion. The only thing that remains to be decided is what women will be featured on the 10 spot. The polling options were chosen from what I can discern to be the top choices folks are being asked about by pollsters.

Although I think it would be great to put a women on one of our notes I sincerely don't think Hamilton should get booted to do so. I'm biased on the subject though, as of all the founding fathers I have read the most about Hamilton. After finishing the Federalist Papers I picked up Ron Chernow's definitive biography of him, "Alexander Hamilton," and have been a fan since.

Unsurprisingly, Chernow has written a piece stating why Hamilton should stay where he is:

Chernow wrote:For a long time, Hamilton was a misunderstood and overlooked figure, consigned to a curious limbo. Among the major founders, he was, aside from Ben Franklin, the one who never made it to the White House and therefore lacked the reverent attention we bestow on presidents. He was also reviled by a succession of political enemies—John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, and James Monroe—who made it to the top and conspired to slant our long-term view of him. As a result, Hamilton’s face was never chiseled on Mount Rushmore, nor did he receive a fancy memorial in Washington. The statue of him outside the Treasury Department is risibly small. The one distinction he could claim was an honored niche on the ten-dollar bill, lifting him into the rarefied company of political immortals.

Hamilton was undeniably the most influential person in our history who never attained the presidency. That he started out as an illegitimate, effectively orphaned, and penniless immigrant from the Caribbean, who didn’t know a soul when he arrived in North America at the start of the American Revolution, makes his story worth celebrating in a nation of immigrants. His contributions to forging our country were gigantic and pervasive, starting with his starring role in the Revolutionary War, when he served as aide-de-camp and chief of staff to George Washington, and as a battlefield hero at Yorktown.

After the war, he personally issued the appeal for a Constitutional Convention, attended it, and was the sole New York delegate to sign the resulting document. To help ratify the new constitution, he spearheaded the writing of The Federalist Papers, publishing fifty-one of those eighty-five luminous essays. They remain the classic gloss on our Constitution and the documents most frequently cited by the Supreme Court. At the New York State Ratifying Convention, Hamilton spoke twenty-six times during a grueling six-week marathon and got the constitution ratified by a narrow margin in a key state.

In 1789, George Washington tapped the thirty-four-year-old Hamilton as the first Treasury secretary. With its tax collectors and customs inspectors, Hamilton’s Treasury Department eclipsed in size the rest of the federal government combined, making him something akin to a prime minister. Drawing on a blank slate, Hamilton arose as the visionary architect of the executive branch, forming from scratch the first fiscal, monetary, tax, and accounting systems. In quick succession, he assembled the Coast Guard, the customs service, and the Bank of the United States—the first central bank and the forerunner of the Federal Reserve System. Most significantly, he took a country bankrupted by revolutionary war debt and restored American credit. All the while, he articulated an expansive vision of the Constitution, converting it into an elastic document that could grow with a dynamic young country.

One reason Hamilton was vilified by his enemies is that they feared him as an agent of modernity at a time when his Jeffersonian opponents espoused an American future that stressed traditional agriculture and small towns. In a stupendous leap, Hamilton argued for a thriving nation populated by cities, banks, corporations, and stock exchanges as well as traditional agriculture. In his famous Report on Manufactures, he enumerated how government could foster manufacturing and provide employment for immigrants. He shaped, in a virtuoso performance, America’s financial infrastructure in its entirety. On the Wall Street of the early 1790s, only five securities were traded: three issues of Treasury securities, the stock of the Bank of the United States, and the stock of the private Bank of New York—all created by Alexander Hamilton.

Especially pertinent in the controversy over the ten-dollar bill is that Hamilton was the figure in our history most identified with paper money. In 1791, he published his Report on the Mint, acting to establish the rudiments of our currency. He endorsed the dollar as our basic currency unit with smaller coins used on a decimal basis and first proposed putting presidential faces on coins. The banknotes of Hamilton’s Bank of the United States counted as the first paper money issued by the new government. Arguably no one ever put a greater stamp on the currency we all use today, and which has become the world’s premier currency as well.


Save Alexander Hamilton

Chernow goes on to make a case that if someone should be replaced to make room for a women, it should be Andrew Jackson.

So where to put a deserving woman on it? The figure obviously ripe for reevaluation is Andrew Jackson on the twenty-dollar bill. For all his populist achievements as president, which were considerable, he was as hostile to the world of modern finance as Hamilton was prophetic. Where President Jackson owned a hundred slaves, Hamilton was an abolitionist who co-founded the New York Manumission Society in the 1780s. And where President Jackson oversaw the forced removal of Indians from the eastern seaboard in the infamous “Trail of Tears,” killing an estimated four thousand Cherokees, Hamilton lent his name and prestige to the creation of an academy in upstate New York designed to educate native-Americans.


I've heard Andrew Jackson put forth by multiple sources as the one who should lose his spot. Apparently a main reason why Hamilton is being targeted is convenience: the treasury department had already earmarked the $10 bill as the next note to get a security related make-over when the clamoring to get a women on our currency boiled over.

So I would like to know what the colossals of this forum opinions are on the following:

1. Should Alexander Hamilton be replaced at all?
2. If not Hamilton, who should lose their spot to make room for an illustrious lady?
3. What American women should take over the $10 bill? (see poll question)
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Re: Hamilton to be taken off the $10: who should replace him

Postby Philly » Sun Jul 19, 2015 3:31 pm

Harriet Tubman but she should be replacing Jackson on the 20. Hamilton is awesome.
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Re: Hamilton to be taken off the $10: who should replace him

Postby The Comrade » Sun Jul 19, 2015 3:54 pm

the fact that jackson is staying and hamilton is going is total bullshit.
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Re: Hamilton to be taken off the $10: who should replace him

Postby The Comrade » Sun Jul 19, 2015 4:06 pm

also i think only presidents or members of government should be on our currency. or no presidents at all. it should be have a continuous theme. not just "token black female and then presidents". so makes it famous landmarks or something or pictures of great american achievements like the moon landing and D-day.
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Re: Hamilton to be taken off the $10: who should replace him

Postby John Galt » Sun Jul 19, 2015 4:13 pm

i think jackson himself would be aghast that he is on the 20 bill

i myself think we should have scenes form battles, or national parks, or hamburgers, or anything other than one person on them

if forced, tubman is a good choice, but annie oakley with some 6shooters would be pretty awesome
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Re: Hamilton to be taken off the $10: who should replace him

Postby The Comrade » Sun Jul 19, 2015 4:16 pm

john brown should be on a bill
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Re: Hamilton to be taken off the $10: who should replace him

Postby John Galt » Sun Jul 19, 2015 4:19 pm

1 - crossing the deleware / war of independence theme. also okay with singing of declaration (currently on the 2). perhaps on the other face.
2 - battle of baltimore / star spangled banner theme
5 - scene from gettysburg mural / civil war theme
10 - d-day / world war theme
20 - moon landing
50 - yellowstone / national park theme
100 - benjamin can stay
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Re: Hamilton to be taken off the $10: who should replace him

Postby John Galt » Sun Jul 19, 2015 4:27 pm

hell i like these way better

http://www.slate.com/blogs/the_eye/2014 ... _bill.html

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i don't like the lack of 1, the weird sizing, and the art could be differently done but the themes are good

argriculture, commerce, uh uh uh oceans, space, nature
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Re: Hamilton to be taken off the $10: who should replace him

Postby Philly » Sun Jul 19, 2015 5:08 pm

The Comrade wrote:also i think only presidents or members of government should be on our currency. or no presidents at all.

Have to have presidents on some at least. You would ruin some classic hip hop songs otherwise.

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Re: Hamilton to be taken off the $10: who should replace him

Postby Stratego » Mon Jul 20, 2015 2:09 am

I vote Hedy Lamar. She co-invented the predecessor to WiFi, help defeat the Nazis, and was a super hot model.
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