Should the U.S. pass the Birthright Citizenship Act?

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Should the U.S. pass the Birthright Citizenship Act?

Postby SmithSmith » Sun Aug 16, 2015 5:08 am

So that all babies born on U.S. soil are no longer automatically made citizens.

The 14th amendment does not include children of illegals, but passing the Birthright citizenship act makes that clear. Only 30 nations in the world assume that if you birth a baby in their land, even if there illegally and against the laws of the nation, the child is legally a citizen of that nation. Only the United States and Canada will let someone cross to their nation illegally, give birth to a baby at the expense of that nation, then allow the child and mother to go back to the country that allows them to keep that citizenship as well. We have to put an end to this madness. It's not right!
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Re: Should the U.S. pass the Birthright Citizenship Act?

Postby Philly » Sun Aug 16, 2015 6:24 am

First off, the Supreme Court gets to clarify what the 14th Amendment means, not Congress.

Second, we are talking about naturally born United States citizens being deported, just cause their parents crossed a border they weren't supposed to.

You wouldn't revoke someone's drivers license cause his parents have multiple DUI's.

You wouldn't make someone file as a sex offender cause his parents got caught hanging out in playgrounds looking for random kids to play doctor with.

You wouldn't take a gun away from someone because his parents held up a bank and shot the security guard.

But you want to deport people who were born here because of something their parents did before they were born.


My great grandfather on my dad's side (his mother's father) immigrated to America with my great grandmother sometime vaguely in the vicinity of World War 1. They came from Eastern Europe. Don't ask me what country - no one knows for sure. My great-grandfather, who I never met, didn't speak much English and never told anyone much about the old world. My great Aunt insisted he tell them what town he came from, so he gave them a name that she wrote down but never looked it up. We found it in her house when she died, and my dad tried to look up where it was but it just turned out to be yiddish or obscure Eastern European Jewish slang for "My Village" or some shit like that. My grandmother asked him once about going to Ellis Island. He laughed and told her that the last name she's been using all her life isn't her real name, cause he made up a fake one to tell the stupid Americans who would never be able to pronounce their real last name. He never directly addressed whether or not he even went to Ellis Island. And his refusal to divulge any information about his native country makes me suspect something shady happened. It's quite possible he cam to America illegally.

His daughter, my Grandmother, was born here in America. She has lived all 90 years of her life in America and except for one cruise to Bermuda, she's never set foot off US soil. She married a World War 2 veteran and had 3 kids. Then her husband died very young and she raised her 3 American children as a single mother, and from a family where no one had ever gone to college, all 3 of her single-parent-raised children not only graduated college, but two of them went on to get professional degrees and the other opened his own successful business, so there was no question that all 5 of her American grandchildren were going to be college bound.

She is the f**k American dream. Textbook. But because her dad may have come here in a shady manner before she was born, you would ship her back to [Unspecified Shithole] in Eastern Europe? f**k off.


I know this law is not retroactive like that, but it would do the exact same thing to someone's grandmother 90 years from now if her parents snuck in, had her and laid low enough to not get caught.
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Re: Should the U.S. pass the Birthright Citizenship Act?

Postby eynon81 » Sun Aug 16, 2015 9:29 am

1. it's a non-issue.

2. most illegals enter the country legally and then simply let their visas expire.

3. your suggestion is un-american. **==



changing the constitution to limit individual rights is disgusting.
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Re: Should the U.S. pass the Birthright Citizenship Act?

Postby Libertarian602 » Sun Aug 16, 2015 11:54 am

My grandad would have been considered a dreamer back in the day, since his dad jumped the border up north. My grandad fought on Korea and Vietnam, retired after 20 years in the army, and starred up a ranch in AZ.

So ya, shit happens. People across the world would give everything they got to get here, legal and illegally. That's because we got it good compared to everyone else. And unlike Europe, we've made immigration work for this country. Getting draconian would be counter productive.
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Re: Should the U.S. pass the Birthright Citizenship Act?

Postby Stratego » Sun Aug 16, 2015 1:42 pm

Philly2 wrote:Second, we are talking about naturally born United States citizens being deported, just cause their parents crossed a border they weren't supposed to.

You wouldn't revoke someone's drivers license cause his parents have multiple DUI's.

You wouldn't make someone file as a sex offender cause his parents got caught hanging out in playgrounds looking for random kids to play doctor with.

You wouldn't take a gun away from someone because his parents held up a bank and shot the security guard.

But you want to deport people who were born here because of something their parents did before they were born.


You don't get a doctorate just because your parents faked a doctorate. US Citizenship should be a reward, not something automatic. To become a US citizen, you should have contributed to the country. Immigrant babies have not yet contributed to the country. Imagine someone getting a citizenship by simply being 'born'.
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Re: Should the U.S. pass the Birthright Citizenship Act?

Postby spacemonkey » Mon Aug 17, 2015 1:07 pm

I think the ultimate goal is to have world wide welfare at the expense of American taxpayers. They are already on the hook for infrastructure in a lot of places, while ours crumbles.
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Re: Should the U.S. pass the Birthright Citizenship Act?

Postby a777pilot » Wed Aug 19, 2015 9:26 am

Yes, pass the Bill.

I want this passed only so that the question of the status of those born here in the USA but of parents not here legally can finally go to the Supreme Court.

This nation needs an answer to this question.
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Re: Should the U.S. pass the Birthright Citizenship Act?

Postby Indy » Wed Aug 19, 2015 10:41 am

How the f*** did everybody decide along with Trump that with all the issues facing this country, deporting Mexicans should be at the top of the list?

Mind-boggling.
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Re: Should the U.S. pass the Birthright Citizenship Act?

Postby Philly » Wed Aug 19, 2015 10:45 am

Indy wrote:How the f*** did everybody decide along with Trump that with all the issues facing this country, deporting Mexicans should be at the top of the list?

Mind-boggling.

Maybe it was in response to all the people who think like this:
Indy wrote:I am so tired of Mexicans and their raping.
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Re: Should the U.S. pass the Birthright Citizenship Act?

Postby spacemonkey » Wed Aug 19, 2015 11:08 am

a777pilot wrote:Yes, pass the Bill.

I want this passed only so that the question of the status of those born here in the USA but of parents not here legally can finally go to the Supreme Court.

This nation needs an answer to this question.

This nation needed an answer forty years ago. **==
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