Labeling

Labeling

Postby exploited » Thu Sep 17, 2015 5:34 pm

As you all know, there has been alot of interesting in GMO food labeling over the years. Similarly, we've made it a point to have processed food products display their ingredients and their nutritional content, so that consumers can make better choices, even though it is obvious to everyone that eating at McDonalds or buying frozen ribs is terrible for you.

The question is, should this idea be applied to something like clothes?

This was recently posted on /r/socialjustice as an idea for clothing labeling:

Image

I don't think it is a bad idea, however I cringe at the amount of bureaucracy that would be required to rank an article of clothing. It seems to me that such an idea would require a great deal of cooperation from apparel companies, all of whom have huge economic incentives not to cooperate. That aside, do you support labeling in general? Do you think it is an effective way of letting consumers make better choices, or is it just another market inefficiency?

Here's some food for thought:

http://www.eufic.org/article/en/nutriti ... on-labels/

Focus groups recently conducted for EUFIC in France, Germany, Italy and the UK have turned up some good news: it seems that consumers both understand the benefits of nutrition and are positive towards ‘healthy and balanced eating’. The bad news, however, is that whilst people know about certain nutrition basics, the terminology used on the label is not really understood. Consumers certainly don’t use the long list of figures normally featured on labels as a tool for building a healthy diet.

It is not a question of trust – people believe the information on the labels to be accurate – but it is more a question of communication. The role of labels is not clear, nutritional information is often confused with the ingredients list, and in many cases people do not understand how to integrate the provided information into their daily dietary choices.

De-Mystifying the label

Our research showed that current nutrition labels are neither inviting nor motivating to use. So what will it take to change this? Broadly, the answer comes in three parts.

Presentation

Not surprisingly, people want labels to be readable, clear, attractive and well structured. They want the information to stand out. Although they seem not to appreciate, they do understand the limitations that small packages and multiple languages present. They want directions to further help (websites, for example, where lifestyle guidance can be found) and they would like consistency or uniformity across products.

Understanding

People feel alienated by the terminology used in nutritional labelling. They need terms they can relate to, which will help them determine what is important. Nutrition is a science, but most consumers are not scientists. What is ‘sodium’? Is it the same as ‘salt’? What are poly-unsaturated fatty acids? What are trans fatty acids? Are they both equally bad, or good, for you? How can we tell?

Whilst they recognise that not everything can be on the label, they need access to additional information that helps them understand how to transform nutritional information into action. Again, clarity, structure and consistency are very important.

Confidence

Consumers need to have confidence that the information provided by labels is derived from a reliable source. It needs to be transparently clear where this information comes from and by whom it is provided and/or endorsed.

A new direction?

It may be, therefore, that much of the current discussion about labelling is not taking into consideration consumers’ needs. More figures, longer lists, denser information will not, our research suggests, have the desired effect of encouraging a healthy diet. Consumers need greater knowledge, before they can understand more facts, and they need the ability to apply this knowledge sensibly.

They need an understandable and manageable reference, endorsed by a suitably trustworthy authority. They need information that is simple and easy to use in the daily dietary food intake.

There are many things in the current labelling terminology that can be improved. However, as long as consumers lack a basic understanding of nutritional terms and requirements, the label information will be lost on them. There is an immediate need therefore for better nutrition education and improved nutrition knowledge. This is the big challenge for government, educators, health professionals and all operators in the food chain.
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Re: Labeling

Postby Saz » Thu Sep 17, 2015 5:40 pm

Easily gamed and I don't think you really want to find out how many people would happily buy the 9.99 slave product over the alternatives.
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Re: Labeling

Postby exploited » Thu Sep 17, 2015 5:49 pm

Saz wrote:Easily gamed and I don't think you really want to find out how many people would happily buy the 9.99 slave product over the alternatives.


Are there any industries that you support labeling?
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Re: Labeling

Postby Saz » Thu Sep 17, 2015 6:12 pm

exploited wrote:
Saz wrote:Easily gamed and I don't think you really want to find out how many people would happily buy the 9.99 slave product over the alternatives.


Are there any industries that you support labeling?


That's a stupid question and obviously goes on a case by case basis. Food products obviously should have some information present but it's not necessary to slap the birth date of the guy who picked the raw ingredients on every package.
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Re: Labeling

Postby exploited » Thu Sep 17, 2015 6:14 pm

Saz wrote:
exploited wrote:
Saz wrote:Easily gamed and I don't think you really want to find out how many people would happily buy the 9.99 slave product over the alternatives.


Are there any industries that you support labeling?


That's a stupid question and obviously goes on a case by case basis. Food products obviously should have some information present but it's not necessary to slap the birth date of the guy who picked the raw ingredients on every package.


It's not a stupid question, it was actually just a question. I was hoping to stimulate some more discussion on the topic by inviting you to share your views on the wider topic.

You've been taking a page out of the Book of NAB.
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Re: Labeling

Postby Motown » Fri Sep 18, 2015 5:13 am

exploited wrote:The question is, should this idea be applied to something like clothes?

This was recently posted on /r/socialjustice as an idea for clothing labeling:

Image



I don't see a need to do this for clothing and I agree that it would a bureaucratic nightmare. I was just clothes shopping the other day and I saw pullovers made in Pakistan from obviously cheap material selling for $6, I don't need a labeling system to help me figure out what's going on there.

I think this clothing labeling idea as presented would be far more useful in shaming some manufacturers into making donations in order to be placed higher up the scale than it would in informing consumers.
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Re: Labeling

Postby NAB » Fri Sep 18, 2015 9:05 am

exploited wrote:
Saz wrote:
exploited wrote:
Saz wrote:Easily gamed and I don't think you really want to find out how many people would happily buy the 9.99 slave product over the alternatives.


Are there any industries that you support labeling?


That's a stupid question and obviously goes on a case by case basis. Food products obviously should have some information present but it's not necessary to slap the birth date of the guy who picked the raw ingredients on every package.


It's not a stupid question, it was actually just a question. I was hoping to stimulate some more discussion on the topic by inviting you to share your views on the wider topic.

You've been taking a page out of the Book of NAB.


Now how did I get dragged into this? I'm going to edit your post......shit.

Anyway, to the topic of labeling, I recently encountered a story about some Whole Foodsesque store advertising non-GMO salt. Think on that for a second, if it even takes that long. :))
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Re: Labeling

Postby spacemonkey » Fri Sep 18, 2015 1:45 pm

Saz wrote:Easily gamed and I don't think you really want to find out how many people would happily buy the 9.99 slave product over the alternatives.

They already do. That's why W-Mart is doing so well.
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