Do you support the "right to be forgotten?"

Do you support the "right to be forgotten?"

Postby exploited » Fri Sep 18, 2015 5:28 pm

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Right_to_be_forgotten

The right to be forgotten is a concept discussed and put into practice in the European Union (EU) and Argentina since 2006.[1][2] The issue has arisen from desires of individuals to "determine the development of their life in an autonomous way, without being perpetually or periodically stigmatized as a consequence of a specific action performed in the past."[3]:231 There has been controversy about the practicality of establishing a right to be forgotten to the status of an international human right in respect to access to information, due in part to the vagueness of current rulings attempting to implement such a right.[4] There are concerns about its impact on the right to freedom of expression, its interaction with the right to privacy, and whether creating a right to be forgotten would decrease the quality of the Internet through censorship and a rewriting of history,[5] and opposing concerns about problems such as revenge porn sites appearing in search engine listings for a person's name, or references to petty crimes committed many years ago indefinitely remaining an unduly prominent part of a person's footprint.[6]

...


Should people have any expectation of being allowed to suppress certain aspects of their personal history? Or should any information that makes into the public sphere, specifically on the internet, be allowed to continue existing, on the grounds of freedom of speech?

I lean towards freedom of speech, however, I'm not quite certain that this will end up being a sensible policy as we move more and more towards total social transparency. Unlike other forms of media, the internet is pretty unique in that once something makes it onto the internet, it is basically impossible to get it off, absent some sort of legal mechanism to force content providers to remove it.

What are your thoughts on this matter?
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Re: Do you support the "right to be forgotten?"

Postby Philly » Fri Sep 18, 2015 7:11 pm

Difficult to see how you even accomplish this, but I think in a just world, people who are arrested for some terrible crime and then acquitted wouldn't have a slew of news stories about it when you google their name.
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Re: Do you support the "right to be forgotten?"

Postby exploited » Fri Sep 18, 2015 7:26 pm

Philly wrote:Difficult to see how you even accomplish this, but I think in a just world, people who are arrested for some terrible crime and then acquitted wouldn't have a slew of news stories about it when you google their name.


And, to be fair, you could simply put a ban on publishing names until conviction.
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Re: Do you support the "right to be forgotten?"

Postby Philly » Fri Sep 18, 2015 7:31 pm

I'd be all for that. Especially when the 24 hour news networks latch onto a random murder trial like Scott Peterson (who was found guilty) or Casey Anthony (who was acquitted) I just can't help but think that their lives are f**k ruined anyway. The verdict will just determine if it's a ruined life in prison or a ruined life outside of prison. We protect the identity of victims in criminal cases, so why not the accused? It really calls into question how much we believe in presumption of innocence.
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Re: Do you support the "right to be forgotten?"

Postby spacemonkey » Sat Sep 19, 2015 12:17 pm

Today, you are guilty till proved otherwise. If you get a media conviction before a jury conviction, your just screwed. The Baltimore cops just got screwed by the six mill payout to the family of some low life even before any trial. A freakin circus. :o)
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Re: Do you support the "right to be forgotten?"

Postby spacemonkey » Sat Sep 19, 2015 12:21 pm

When a man or woman is let out of the cage (prison), there should be no strings attached. Sitting in the cage should pay their debt IN FULL. The strings almost guarantees a high recidivism rate.
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Re: Do you support the "right to be forgotten?"

Postby Motown » Sat Sep 19, 2015 1:35 pm

exploited wrote:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Right_to_be_forgotten

The right to be forgotten is a concept discussed and put into practice in the European Union (EU) and Argentina since 2006.[1][2] The issue has arisen from desires of individuals to "determine the development of their life in an autonomous way, without being perpetually or periodically stigmatized as a consequence of a specific action performed in the past."[3]:231 There has been controversy about the practicality of establishing a right to be forgotten to the status of an international human right in respect to access to information, due in part to the vagueness of current rulings attempting to implement such a right.[4] There are concerns about its impact on the right to freedom of expression, its interaction with the right to privacy, and whether creating a right to be forgotten would decrease the quality of the Internet through censorship and a rewriting of history,[5] and opposing concerns about problems such as revenge porn sites appearing in search engine listings for a person's name, or references to petty crimes committed many years ago indefinitely remaining an unduly prominent part of a person's footprint.[6]

...


Should people have any expectation of being allowed to suppress certain aspects of their personal history? Or should any information that makes into the public sphere, specifically on the internet, be allowed to continue existing, on the grounds of freedom of speech?

I lean towards freedom of speech, however, I'm not quite certain that this will end up being a sensible policy as we move more and more towards total social transparency. Unlike other forms of media, the internet is pretty unique in that once something makes it onto the internet, it is basically impossible to get it off, absent some sort of legal mechanism to force content providers to remove it.

What are your thoughts on this matter?


I agree with the general idea behind this but I don't agree with the way the EU chose to implement it. They shouldn't have exempted media organizations and it seems like this is just as much anti-Google as it is pro-right to be forgotten.

What they basically said was if you walk into a newsstand that sells over a hundred papers and magazines and you find something about yourself that you'd like to have removed in one of them then instead of suing that one publication you sue the newsstand instead.

People are just going to have to realize and accept the fact that their Internet and social media footprints are now just as important as their credit ratings and need to be cultivated just as seriously and that is an individual responsibility.

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Re: Do you support the "right to be forgotten?"

Postby Medius » Mon Sep 21, 2015 12:11 pm

Motown wrote:I agree with the general idea behind this but I don't agree with the way the EU chose to implement it. They shouldn't have exempted media organizations and it seems like this is just as much anti-Google as it is pro-right to be forgotten.

What they basically said was if you walk into a newsstand that sells over a hundred papers and magazines and you find something about yourself that you'd like to have removed in one of them then instead of suing that one publication you sue the newsstand instead.

People are just going to have to realize and accept the fact that their Internet and social media footprints are now just as important as their credit ratings and need to be cultivated just as seriously and that is an individual responsibility.


I generally agree with this. Google is just being punished for its popularity as the interface for getting information. What matters is the people who are putting out the information, not the people indexing the information. I think they are also being punished for their own past ethical decisions to restrict results for common decency, in that they worked to make their results weed out bad things that people don't want to see in their search results, thus setting a precedent that it should be expected.

In the long-run though, it is good for google. They are in a field that should easily allow a competitor to jump in with a better search algorithm and compete. But the good ol' world governments are ready to ensure that Google will reign forever by making it economically unfeasible for competitors to enter the field, as they won't be able to afford the staffing necessary to adhere to all of these cryptic requirements on something that shouldn't even be restricted.

On a related note, I do hope someone soon sues the phone book for listing phone numbers that are completely unsafe to be calling. There are serial killers, rapists, drug lords, and any number of things available at the push of a few digits all indexed nicely and delivered to your doorstep.
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